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line in terms of fiscal cliff spending and revenue raised in the next three weeks, and, yes, that's at the end of the month. they'll get through that, but, again, you want to have leverage when you have that conversation. that leverage is going to, i think, hinge off of what you were saying, and i think you're right. boehner has probably the better hand to play here given that really there's not a strong hand, but it's a better hand than what he otherwise would have in terms of negotiations. if he is just allowed get in the room and negotiate the deal because he knows he has all these other, you know, arrows in his quiver that he can use. >> i just -- i think it's hopeful that they went -- that he went to the white house yesterday and almost kind of hopeful that at least everybody is agreeing not to say anything, as opposed to leaking bad news. really quickly, jonathan, the president is going to michigan, and he will be -- well, he is there en route now. the right to work law in michigan could be signed as early, i believe, finalized as early as tomorrow. what is the president owe
'm not sure you're going to get a big deal right now but you might get enough to avoid the fiscal cliff and then more fighting next year over spending. >> will republicans accept a 38% tax rate for the wealthy? and will democrats accept reductions in entitlement spending? >> that's a good question. corker would accept 37% but he speaks for a few senators. he doesn't speak for the house republican majority and john boehner though it seems to be moving that direction. i'm not sure the president would accept 37% because i'm not sure he gets enough money. you need enough money, whether there's some -- yes, partial increase in rates and then some tightening of loopholes, but then again, so much of this talk has been about taxes and what the democrats have refused to talk about at this point is spending cuts and serious entitlement reform. republicans will demand there whether it's part of the deal in the fiscal cliff or to raise the debt limit. >> i'm glad you brought that up. in terms of spending, which clearly has to be cut, the president from the reports this week wants to raise the debt
spending. the fiscal cliff will result in tax increases and federal spenng cuts. >> both parties are kind of, hey, i'm going to do my thing, you're going to do your thing, nobody seems to want to give in. >> many shoppers agree, as tax paying citizens, one of the top things on their wish list for christmas is for the president and congress to compromise and to get a deal done. >> please start working together and remember the people who put you in office. >> nadia ramdass, wbal-tv 11 news. >> jews around the world celebrated the beginning of hanukkah saturday night. in chicago, hundreds gathered to watch the lighting of an overicized menorah. hanukkah commemorates the jewish uprising in the second century b.c. according to tradition, when the jews dedicated the temple in jerusalem, a single vial of oil burned for eight days. and some people celebrated hanukkah with a dance party. creative alliance hosted a party with music, dancing and singing. >> tonight is first night of hanukkah, the celebration that brings light into the darkness and we celebrate freedom and liberation movements and r
cliff is a series of spending cuts and expiring tax credits set to take effect in 27 days. today the president made the case to a group of top business leaders. his plan calls for a higher tax rate on earned income exceeding $250,000 and republicans say that would be a job killer. though are pushing for raise revenue by closing tax loopholes and deductions, something that the president says would not raise enough cash. wendell is live with more on the white house. how much much revenue would the president's plan raise by raising the tax rates for high earners? >> about $1 trillion the next 10 years from the rate increase. that is just part of a package that also includes limits on deductions and tax credits and aims to pull in a total of $1.6 trillion. republicans want to keep tax rates the same b end deductions and loopholes but obama says that will not get the job done. >> it is not possible to raise the amount of revenue required for a balance the package if all you rely on is closing deductions and loopholes. let me amend that. it is possible to do theoretically but it is not
lead time. but it's also important to remember that the fiscal cliff isn't only tax rates and spending cuts. the fiscal cliff also includes the nation's agriculture policy, which expires at the end of the year. it includes patches to medicare formulas. patches to social security formulas. so this is a huge mess of issues. we're not even talking about those issues yet. congressional negotiators and the white house aren't talking about these huge host of other issues that are on the table. the thought is if they can get past tax rates and spending cuts, then they will be able to deal with the peripheral issues. but we don't have much time. if a deal isn't reached or a framework isn't reached in the next week or, so it's going to be a big problem. >> all right, thanks for that. good to see you. > >>> nokia -- we'll tell you more when we come back in a few moments. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- ♪ you can stay in and like something... ♪ [ car alarm deactivates ] ♪ ...or you can get out there with your family and actually like something. ♪ the lexus december to rememb
-team here tonight. stay with us. >>> the fiscal cliff fiasco. the obama plan, the boehner plan, will either alter america's rising rate of spending or lessen the size of our bloated government? the answer in tonight's chalk talk. >>> is the housing market really recovering? $17 trillion is riding on the answer. the president and ceo of citi mortgage joins us next. twins. i dn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligation b obligatio. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is eep. introducing the ishares core, budinglos for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 ilarge professisional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectis, risks, charges and expenses. ad and consider itarefully bere investing. ri includes possible ss of principal. lou: new reports show foreign investment is helping the housing market slowly recover. citimortgage president and ceo sanjiv das joins us here in just moments to discuss that and much more when it comes to housing. in the mo
as the fiscal cliff. if that happens, it will trigger a recession, or worse. so, president obama is taking action and insisting that republicans agree to increase the existing marginal tax rates on the wealthiest top 2% of u.s. taxpayers. and of course, there is more to the deal. but there will be no negotiations on that big part of the deal unless that tax on the wealthiest 2% is negotiated now. the president could not be more emphatic in stressing the indispensable element of surmounting the cliff is that super-rich revenue. >> we're not insisting on rates just out of spite. or out of any kind of partisan bickering. but rather because we need to raise a certain amount of revenue. >> okay. here is john boehner, the republican house speaker. >> if you look at the plans that the white house have talked about thus far, they couldn't pass either house of the congress. >> republicans proposed raising $800 billion in extra revenues. and that revenue should come through tax reform and closing loopholes. happy new year. question, patrick, looking into the crystal ball and tell us about this janua
men left standing between all of us and the fiscal cliff. in 25 days america goes over the edge. that's when severe tax hikes and cuts in spending begin. according to the "new york times," john boehner has asked democratic leaders to step aside so he and the president can attempt to negotiate a deal one-on-one and no one is objecting. paul steinhauser is live from washington. paul, you got some new polling for us. what do americans want to see in a deal? >> it's interesting what they want to see and what they don't want to see. one of the biggest sticking points between democrats and republicans over averting the fiscal cliff is raising taxes on those making over $250,000 a year. look at this from quinnipiac university, the question was asked are you okay with that? 65% say they support such a move to avert the fiscal cliff. this is the third poll over the last two weeks to show the same thing, that most americans are okay with raising those taxes on incomes over $250,000 a year. go to the next screen, there's a partisan divide here. this explains why most republicans are dead set aga
a deal on the fiscal cliff or else automatic spending cuts and tax hikes will kick in and with the fiscal cliff looming, our consumers feeling at all concerned? christine romans joins us now from new york with that. good morning, christine. >> good morning, ted. first, let me tell you what's going right in the economy for consumers. there's a whole host of things. the job markets, 7.7% unemployment, the lowest in four years. you've got the housing market showing signs of recovery. rising home values in much of the country. gas prices, did you notice? they're down 46 cents over the past couple of months. they're expected to keep going lower and the dow is up 20 points now. the dow is above 1,300 and the s&p 500 is up 12% this year. so, what could go wrong? fiscal cliff. this is something weighing op consumer sentiment and we're starting to see it in the weekly -- look at this -- 39% said it would affect it some. they don't seem to have much faith in congress to fix it and any time except 11th hour and maybe a week into the new year and there's this payroll tax holiday that most people have
recession, triggeri triggering events the fiscal cliff. is tax hikes and deep spending cuts january 1st if law makes can't come up with an alternative. no word if any progress was made. both men issuing statements about the talks, saying the lines of communication remain open. and police in london are owning up to authorities in awes as as the investigation deepens into an of radio station's hoax call made to the hospital. and made by these two. and they managed to dupe a nurse into giving out personal, private information and that nurse, by the way, may have committed suicide. so far police have not exactly linked her death to the prank and now for the time being, we're hearing from members of her family. >> and i'll really miss her a lot. she was a good sister-in-law, i can't forget her, she was so good. >> harris: family members talking to the media today for the first time. dj's are off the job and that may not stop the possibility of criminal charges and joining me, lee yeah, thanks for being with us tonight. >> hi, nice to be on. >> what are we learning about, whether metro london
out of balance. a large piece of the fiscal cliff is $94 billion in automatic government spending cuts over the next year. part of a trillion dollars in federal cuts over the next decade though even with these cuts the federal government is still projected to spend more each year over the next decade. to put this in perspective, one former cbo director says the costs of hurricane sandy could easily wipe out most of next year's savings. >> with a trillion dollar deficit right now. so if you cut 94 billion and nothing else changes you barely dented the deficit. the other programs are growing. we'll not see spending decline. in fact we'll likely have a emergency spending bill for sandy that is 60 billion. 94 is gone right there. >> even with a trillion dollars in cuts federal spending is on the way up every year starting with 3.5 trillion this fiscal year. nearly 3.6 trillion in 2014. 4 trillion by 2016 and 5 trillion by 2021. the cbo says even allowing 5 trillion in tax increases to hit the economy the next decade the federal government still spends $2.3 trillion more than it takes in. b
. the kinds of spending you're seeingo a great eent on the fiscal cliff and president's pl and lesser extent to the republican plan, largely disctionary spending cs. a lot coming out of defense. these are not longerm ructural chaes t will put on a path to a balaed budt. that will not happen. melissa: the other thing that struckme about the graphic when you look at it, the threat f from republicans hey, we would rath go over the cliff rather than take the president's deal, to me doesn't look terribly credible when you look at actual numbers. unss you take into perspective we're not really going overor years. but it is just going over the cliff is so focus on raising taxes, on absolutely everybody and spending cuts are really nothat imprsive in tes of getting, you know, the gap down smalle they say if you compare it to the white house plan they would rather g over the cliff. i'm not sure that is really credible given those mbers. what do you think?. >> way some rublicans not l, growing number of republicans are looking at this, assigningle to the president, making clea this t president'slan
developments out of the region, but first tonight, urgent developments on the fiscal cliff show down. tim guy ne geithner announced of of the white house that we would, quote, absolutely go over the fiscal cliff which would trigger tax cuts and spending increases unless taxes increase on the top two percent of wage earnings. >> i want you you to understand when it comes to raising taxes on the wealthy. if republicans do not agree to that, is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthy. >> all right. it appears the very definition of the american dream is now being rewritten by president barack obama. now, today our commander-in-chief publicly said he's not going to play games with the fiscal cliff, but that is just not reality. right now the president is playing a very dangerous game of chicken and this is with your paycheck and the american dream. meanwhile, the republicans have allowed themselves to get caught in a circular firing squad. they're negotiat
the president to come up with a plan for spending cuts and tax revenue to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff we're talking so much b. otherwise we know there will be automatic tax hikes. there are also the spending cuts that kick in starting in january. the pentagon will bear the brunt of the automatic spending cuts. some republicans say mandatory cuts are better than no cuts at all and we should put defense spending on the chopping block to accomplish the long-term goal of reducing the deficit. joining me now oklahoma congressman james langford, his second term in congress. what do you think about that, some suggesting this is in a political article that the republicans are foresee questions tracing if that is the only way to cut the debt and deficit. >> the challenge of it is this is really part sue of the debt ceiling debate we had last summer. we wanted a strategic plan to reduce the spending. the house passed that in may. we had an outlined plan to reduce spending. we had no answer from them. the see questions station wa sequestration was the last report. i haven't been in congress a longt
increases and spending cuts that people here in washington call the fiscal cliff. most house members are going home today with only 27 days to make a deal. two house leaders who are not going home are with me in the situation room. they're working very hard to avoid the fiscal cliff. thanks so much for coming in. for so long, republicans wanted to extend the bush tax cuts forever, now for 98% of the american people, the democrats are saying, we're ready. we've given up, we'll let you have those bush tax cuts for as long as possible. let's just resolve that, we'll move on to some of the tougher issues later. let's make sure that 98% of the american families have these lower tax rates into next year. why not give that? >> the debate over those top two pshsz, is really a strong man debate. what we need is tax reform in america. we need a simpler less complicated tax code. >> i agree with you. we need a tax reform. why not resolve this one issue, make sure taxes don't increase for 98% of the americans, 100% of americans for their first $250,000 a year. let them have that, and then move o
this done more than me. >> for the first time, plan for massive spending cuts from going over the fiscal cliff warning business executives, the economy could take another hit if republicans decide to extend just to middle class tax cuts to avoid the cliff for now and come back next year with more leverage to tie spending cuts and medicare reform to another hike in the nation's debt ceiling. >> we're not going to play that game next year. if congress, in any way suggests they tie negotiations to debt ceiling votes, and take us to the brink of default again as part of a budget negotiioion, i will not play that game. >> republicans held their meeting with small business owners and denied they are trying to punt until next year. >> i'll be here. i'll be available at any moment to sit down with the president to get serious about solving the problem. >> they noted the president has not scheduled any meetings with g.o.p. leaders in weeks and not offered a counterproposal to boehner's plan from last week. >> frankly, it was the balanced approach the president's been asking for. we need a respons
to the fiscal cliff. here's what we do know. we know that the president wants more stimulus spending and an increase in the debt limit without any cuts or reforms. that's not fixing our problem, frankly, it's making it worse. and on top of that, the president wants to raise tax rates on many small business owners. now, even if we did exactly what the president wants, we would see red ink for as far as the eye can see. that's not fixing our problem either, it's making it worse, and it's hurting our economy. i think the members know i'm an optimist. i'm hopeful that we can reach an agreement. this is a serious issue, and and there's a lot at stake. the american people sent us here to work together towards the best possible solution, and that means cutting spending. now, if the president doesn't agree with our approach, he's got an obligation to put forward a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. was right now -- because right now the american people have to be scratching their heads and wondering when is the president going to get serious. rick: so that, of course, the spea
to listen in a little more to see what he has to say about the fiscal cliff and otherwise. >> entirely on spending cuts, or a variation that has emerged is that we can do so while still lowering rates by closing loopholes and deductions. and you've heard from my team but let me just repeat. we don't have any objection to tax reform, tax simplification. closing loopholes, closing deductions, but there is a bottom line, an amount of revenue that is required in order for us to get a real, meaningful deficit reduction plan that hits the numbers that are required for us to stabilize our debt and deficits. and -- [. [no audio] kwroe. jenna: we gave it our best shot. sometimes we can't do it. the president speaking at the white house at the business roundtable about the economy. fiscal cliff certainly the issue in the short term for a lot of big businesses and certainly for a lot of american taxpayers. however, long term is another story when it comes to the economy, and entitlements, the president referring to that as well. as we continue to get that feedback you can check it out
spending decreases if you go over the fiscal cliff than if you deal with president obama. >> greta: well, it appears to many in the city that it's politico check mate for the president. if we go over the fiscal cliff, what it means is the taxes will go up on the wealthy, the big earners. it also goes up on the middle class. i assume the middle class will look to the rawp republicans foe fact that their taxes come up so political check mate. >> i'm not so sure. president obama could avoid that very simply by putting maybe two or three to one expenditure reductions on the table for revenue increases, something like sim responsibl simpson bow. he has a formula given to him by a commission he appointed and heted that formula and presented to the republicans a program which was basically just a massive tax increase over and above the massive tax increase that's going to take place with the bush tax cuts expiring, so i don't see where there's -- he hasn't given them room to compromise. maybe if he had put his tax increases on the table and put up expenditure reductions of, you know, one and a
them at their word, it sounds like the president is anxious to go over the fiscal cliff, and he leaves very little room for republicans to negotiate with him with a 1.7 trillion dollar tax increase, 50 billion more in stimulus spending, and absolutely no expenditure reductions that are going to take place right now. i mean, from the point of view of republicans, you're going to get more spending decreases if you go over the fiscal cliff than if you deal with president obama. >> greta: well, it appears to many in the city that it's politico check mate for the president. if we go over the fiscal cliff, what it means is the taxes will go up on the wealthy, the big earners. it also goes up on the middle class. i assume the middle class will look to the rawp republicans foe fact that their taxes come up so political check mate. >> i'm not so sure. president obama could avoid that very simply by putting maybe two or three to one expenditure reductions on the table for revenue increases, something like sim responsibl simpson bow. he has a formula given to him by a commission he appointed and
of the fiscal cliff negotiations. the mortgage interest deduction. government spending on this will reach $100 million by 2014, making it the third largest tax break on the books. who does it help? 41 million people. the most recent irs data showed that 41 million people claimed this deduction on their 2010 tax returns. the tax policy center says it tends to benefit upper middle class families the most. these bars show income in the circles the average savings. for those with incomes of less than $40,000 a year, their savings is $91, look at the people who make $250,000 and more. their average savings is about $5500. this benefits people most on both coasts and cities like chicago, with higher property prices, and we watch the fiscal cliff negotiations closely for what could happen next to this tax goody next year. >> here's the question i'm hearing people ask, if we go off the cliff here, how big a hit will we take on taxs? stand by, because i'm about to give you the closest answer i possibly can. to help me with that is laurie montgomery, she is the fiscal policy reporter for the washington
in washington. speak up for the fiscal cliff is part of the half trillion dollars in cuts to the pentagon. the defense has been saying we will not plan for sequestration's because they don't want to be cautious because it is like a gun to the head. they're now looking into planning for this because we are getting pretty late, and that may become a reality. back to you. melissa: rich edson, thank you so much. lori: let's continue this discussion. it is going to happen, it is exactly what the democrats want. according to scott hodge of the tax foundation. what are some alternatives to raising revenue? joining me with some ideas. to your point, you're written quite extensively on this topic. it seems the economy is poised to fall off the cliff and that's what the democrats and the president wants to happen. >> they want to allow all the bush tax cuts to expire. it happens naturally automatically. they don't even have to vote for it. in january we had to lower taxes for everybody. getting it very simply. lori: a lot of people are concerned. if we do go over the cliff, there's no resolution fo
agreement, is he not particularly interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff and he's clearly not interested at all in cutting any spending. >> reporter: but behind all the public posturing, there is still contact between the president's office and the speaker's people. and between the two men themselves. but everyone else is out of the loop. and there is some confidence, at least here at the white house, that they can find a solution. norah, charlie? >> bill plante, thanks. >>> november jobs report is out. rebecca jarvis is here. good morning. what do the numbers tell us? >> things are looking a lot better than we were anticipating. 146,000 new jobs created in the month of november. unemployment rate dips to 7.7% and there's two big reasons to why the report came out better than most people were expecting. first of all, the impact from superstorm sandy. it wasn't there. that's what the bureau of labor sta stisks told us. we thought it might have a significant impact. it didn't. second of all, a number of people gave up on looking for work. that's why you see the significant decline in the u
that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending the president wants to raise tax rates. even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion-dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. listen, washington has got a spending problem not a revenue problem. if the president doesn't agree with our proposal i believe that he's got an obligation to families and small businesses to offer a plan of his own, a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. we are ready and eager to talk to the president about such a plan. >> you did speak with the president earlier this week, can you characterize that call? did he have any kind of counter offer? also, we understand that he is making clear that it's got to be increase in rates for the wealthy or no deal. are you willing to give a little bit maybe not all the way to 39.6? >> the phone call was pleasant, just more of the same. the conversations that the staff had yesterday, jus
of course and the prospect of increased taxes as we get closer to the fiscal cliff. looks like everybody's taxes are going up no matter how this thing is comes out. consumer spending accounts for more than 2/3 of economic output. especially important at this time of year of course when a lot of sectors in all of these areas have been struggling, here is a bit of good news. martha: okay. take it. bill: not a lot. if you're driving on the road, thanks to shrinking demand manned lower fuel prices gas is sinking like a stone. a drop of 34 cents in the past month. in st. louis, drivers paying just over $3. even l.a. is paying 3.68. which is below four bucks where they have been for a very long time. even further drops expected in the coming days. martha: a devastating loss this morning. jennie rivera, the mexican american singer on the verge of crossing over to this country in u.s. popularity is presumed to have been killed when a private plane crashed in monterrey, mexico. authorities have not confirmed her debt. her relatives say they have few doubts she was on board that plane. she was hea
cuts that would be imposed by the fiscal cliff would be devastating. it would send unemployment higher. it would cost jobs. the republicans, as peter says, are going to insist on some cuts anyway, so bottom line is we are going to see a weaker economy into the beginning of next year. probably one way or the other. now, the counter to that, peter, is that there are forces in the economy that are strengthening it. this energy boom that we've got, the natural gas, the amount of fracturing that we're doing, the fact that housing has been doing tremendously well, and interest rates remain very low with prices, so there's some sense that there's a bit of a renaissance on the horizon, and if the government doesn't mess that up too much, 2013 could end up being as good as 2012 if not a little better. i don't know if you completely disagree with that, peter, but i think there's enough good going on that it could offset the bad. >> to you think it could go up to 10% unemployment. do you agree with peter on that? >> i don't know. i don't know if it will go go up to 10%. there are two scenarios. o
changes to entitlement spending by the end of these fiscal cliff negotiations. it looks like democratic leaders are right now warming to the idea of raising medicare premiums for wealthier people. you in the past have been somewhat outspoken in terms of your opposition to the idea of altering entitlements in a dramatic way. are you changing your tune? >> no. however, i will say this. we have taken seriously the fact that we have an obligation to our seniors, that medicare has worked for millions, almost 450 million americans, seniors mostly but disabled. and we want to start the discussion about medicare with the promise we are going to keep medicare and find a way to contain the rate of growth in costs under medicare and all health care been helpful. >> sure. >> but we'll meet that obligation to our seniors. that's where i think we start. >> it sounds like you are open to the idea, then, of some tweaks to medicare, to some tweaks to entitlements for revenue. >> my conditions are -- and i think this is true for most democrats -- is that we maintain the universality of medicare, all seni
, spending cuts. that's what the fiscal cliff is all about. it would all start with the start of the new year. i want to get to senator jeff merkley. he's a democrat from the state of oregon. he's on both the budget committee and the banking, housing, and urban affairs committee. nice to have you with us, sir. thanks for joining us. >> you're welcome. >> thank you. before we get to fiscal cliff, let's talk a little bit about syria. there are now reports that they may be loading the components that would make up sarin gas. and i'm curious to know and i think a lot of people are watching this, does this mean that we are headed, the united states is headed into military action considering what we know about the red line, if you will, that hillary clinton laid out pretty clearly? >> it was very important for her to draw a very clear line. because any use of chemical weapons has to be responded to internationally. i'm sure the secretary of state is immersed with russia right now, is in negotiations with russia for a united front against this absolutely unacceptable possibility. >> okay. so she's l
of the fiscal cliff. let me take a look at that. >> no real reform. instead spending taxes. we neat bipartisan ideas we can all support. >> dana, is any of that going to make a difference or maybe a broader point is how much are outside groups generally, whether it's on the hill or on tv influencing this debate? >> if it works as well as karl rove's effort during the campaign, i think the president is going to ask him to run more of those ads because it didn't work out so well for him the last time. this is a little different from a political campaign in that spending by interest groups is probably not going to be big enough to crowd out all of this noise that's being made here. i think that interview you just had with tom price was extraordinary for what he didn't say. he didn't say i won't allow taxes to increase. he said it depends on what the overall package is. that's an extraordinary admission is for one of the most conservative congressmen in the house and i think it shows where these guys are headed. >> when you look at the polls and you see how the messaging is working, susan, and to
, where do we need to be in order to serve that? >> we are not going into this fiscal cliff from a position of strength. there is no doubt, if we cliff dive on this we're going to have a high unemployment a lot of people will be laid off because of the spending cuts and tax increases. >> heather: and we are facing tax increases. >> absolutely. >> heather: thank you. >> gregg: new chaos unfolding in the middle east as egypt's military threatens the protestors there. syria preparing to unleash chemical weapons and people are scared seen here running for their lives to prevent two catastrophes from getting a whole lot worse. staechb yates will be with us next. [ male announcer ] red lobster's crabfest ends soon. hurry in and try five succulent entrees, like ourender snow crab paired with savory garlic shrimp. just $12.99. come into red lobster and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. but they haven't experienced extra strength bayer advanced aspirin. in fact, in a recent survey, 95% of people who trieit agreed that it relieved their headache fast. vi
. martha: west virginia senator joe manchin, a democrat discussing the fiscal cliff, social security within medicare. he believes they must be run more efficiently. >> last year the office of budget management says $115 billion was misspent. that's a tremendous savings right there. they are both much lower than everyone says we need. all economists say we need a minimum of $4 trillion or greater swing. that means a combining of many things. i think both of them are in the two or not much more than two or lower than two. that only goats you halfway there. i don't know how we got off track of what we really need to fix this. martha: he argues the economy is ready to take off if people would just stop playing the blame game. bill: one of the changes that may be coming is the reduction in the mortgage interest rate duck you can claim. but according to the i.r.s. only a small percentage of americans claim it after all. all. 37% in maryland and 15% in north dakota. 73 per of americans are opposed to changing that. martha: the owner of popular restaurant chains claims complaints about obama-care h
of this is that some people are trying to downplay the affects of the fiscal cliff saying if we go over for a few days it will be okay. ceos aren't saying that. you look at third quarter gdp, companies are spending less money on software and equipment because they don't know what's going to happen. the effects of the fiscal cliff are already holding back some things. >> of course. what stood out to me from howard schultz, the people that need it the most, the average american will feel this to the core. confidence is the corner stone. >> it makes you make decisions, big decisions, small decisions. i'm not going to buy that or do that, i'm scared to death. here's my question for the two of you. are more big ceos falling in line with the yes, let's raise the taxes on the 2%? >> if i don't know if a majority. would you say a majority? >> i think they want a deal and people have to make -- it's hard to make compromises. >> we've heard it from goldman sac sachs, warren buffett, schultz. >> big names there. >> they want clarity. the interesting thing to me, the stock market and bond market haven't freaked o
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 92 (some duplicates have been removed)